Version 2 Effects

 

How do the Version 2 effects differ from the Version 1 effects?

 

Whereas many of the Version 1 effects were available in separate Monophonic & Polyphonic versions, in version 2, many modules are switchable between Monophonic and Polyphonic.  By right-clicking on the module, you can select the 'Switch to Single/Polyphonic mode' option and the module will change accordingly. If operating in Monophonic mode the module will be green, and blue in Polyphonic mode. Many effects (modulation effects) are only available in Monophonic versions anyway as a polyphonic version would not make any sense.

 

The Pan module is now to be found in the Mix & Gain folder.

 

The percentage in brackets is the DSP load on one single Sharc chip, taken from the Robin Chard's v2 DSP usage chart.

 

Chorus (4.9%)

A mono to stereo effect, and thus best used last in the signal chain. Used to 'fatten' sounds, producing the effect of many voices from one. Choruses work by layering two identical signals with a slight delay between them.  The delay time is altered periodically by an internal LFO whose rate and depth can be controlled by the rate and depth controls. Control the amount and phase of the delayed signal by using the Mix1 & Mix2 controls.

Delay (3.3%)
A delay produces 'echoes' of the original signal, at intervals specified by the Time control. The Feedback control determines how much of the repeated signal is routed back to the input, and hence how many times the delay will sound. The High Damp can be used to create a natural sounding fade as it removes a portion of the high frequency in the feedback signal with each successive pass. Dry and Wet determine how much of the treated and untreated signal passes through respectively. The bypass button 'kills' the delay, allowing the original signal to pass through unaffected. This is a mono delay.
Tempo Delay (6.7%)

A stereo delay, allowing different delay times to be set for the right and left channels. If the 'Cross' button is switched on then the output of the left channel is fed back into the right channel and vice versa. The delay can be set so that its delay times are set to a division of the external Midi clock. Switch on the 'External' button, and then connect the output of Frequency Divider to the FL (Frequency L) and FR (Frequency Right) inputs. 

The Delay can take a Stereo input, or a mono input to its left Input.

Flanger (7.8%)
A Flanger works in a very similar way to a Chorus, by layering a signal with an identical but delayed  copy of the signal.  However, the delay times used in a delay are much shorter than in a Chorus, and the effect is not just to make the sound 'fatter', but also to produce considerable coloration to the sound. This is because the short length of the delay line acts in the same manner as a comb filter, producing rich harmonic overtones. 

As well as the normal Dry/Wet & Bypass controls, the flanger has controls for the Rate, which controls the frequency of modulation to the length of the delay line; Depth, which controls the strength of the delay modulation, and Feedback, which controls the amount of the effected signal which is fedback to the devices inputs.

Tempo Flanger (7.9%)
As above, but with the option to control the rate of delay time modulation with an External Midi clock. Connect the output of a Frequency Divider to the 'Ext Freq' input, and switch on the 'External' button.
Phaser (7.2%)
A phaser combines a signal with a phase shifted version of itself to produce creative filtering effects. The phase shifts are frequency dependent, and modulated by an LFO whose rate & depth are controllable from the front panel. As various different frequencies are accentuated or (nearly) cancelled by the modulated phase shifting, the phaser creates a characteristic 'whooshing' effect - similar to a Flanger, but with its own distinctive sound. Feedback determines the amount of the effected signal which is sent back to the inputs. A phaser can sound 
Tempo Phaser (7.2%)
As above, but the rate of the LFO modulating the frequencies shifted can be locked to an external tempo.
Distortion (1.6%)

Output can be chosen between Soft and Hard distortion - Soft is similar to the effect  brought on by Analogue tape saturation, whereas hard is produced by 'clipping' the signal, resulting in an edgier tone.
Compressor (3.9%)

A compressor alters the dynamic range of a signal. It can be used to 'even out' the differences between loud and quiet signals, reducing the level of the loudest signals without changing the nature of the sound itself.

Possible uses for a compressor include controlling the dynamic range of a live performance so that it will fit into the fairly narrow dynamic range of recorders, etc. Other applications include making a signal's average level higher, increasing the apparent sustain on a guitar, evening out a vocal or bass guitar performance, fattening up sounds, and many more.

The controls are as follows:

Attack: Adjusts how long the compressor waits once the input signal level rises above the specified threshold before it begins decreasing the signal level.

Release: Adjusts how long the compressor waits once the input signal level falls below the specified threshold before it begins fading out the reduction of signal level.

Threshold: Sets the signal level above which signal level reduction begins.

Ratio: Adjusts the ratio by which the signal level is reduced in relationship to the increase in original signal level when the original signal level is above the specified threshold.

Gain: This control adjusts the signal gain, determining the overall output of the Compressor.

The LED's display the level of the incoming signal, the reduction in the signal level and the level of the outgoing signal.

Limiter (3.9%)
A limiter is used to reduce the level of the loudest parts of a recording, so that the overall level of the track can be increased without distortion. Softer passages become louder, but signals going over a certain loudness threshold have their levels reduced. Very similar in concept and control to a Compressor.

The controls are:

Attack:: Adjusts how long the Limiter waits once the input signal level rises above the specified threshold before it begins decreasing the signal level.

Release: Adjusts how long the Limiter waits once the input signal level falls below the specified threshold before it begins fading out the reduction of the signal.

Threshold: Sets the signal level above which level reduction begins.

Ratio: Adjusts the ratio by whichthe  signal level is reduced in relationship to the increase
in original signal level when the original signal level is above the specified threshold.

Gain: This control adjusts the signal gain, determining the overall output of the Limiter.

The LED's display the level of the incoming signal, the reduction in the signal level and the level of the outgoing signal.

Decimator (3.0%)

Decimation means literally 'to kill one in ten' , but in this case it simply means to resample at reduced bit resolution and/or sample rate by a user determined amount.  Effectively, the signal is being resampled before being output.

Both bit resolution reduction and sample rate reduction can be switched on or off. The results can range from mild distortion to quite harsh digital aliasing and quantisation noise. Use it to achieve that sought-after 'lo-fi' effect!

Bit Quantizer (0.6%)

Reduces the internal  precision of the signal processing. The lower the value the fewer the number of bits used in computing the signal. At low values you will get noticeable 'quantisation' artifacts, as the signal is 'rounded' down and the precisions of the signal is lost.
Ring Modulator (0.4%)
The ring modulator outputs the product (multiplication) of its two input signals. It can be used to create bell-like and other weird tones, but can also be used for modulation of modulation signals.  As the ring modulator offers only connections and no controls of its own, the intensity of the effect must be controlled from outside, e.g., using mix modules. A 'classic' ring-mod effect is to use 2 Sine waves as the inputs and at intervals of (eg) a fifth.
Mono Insert (0% (when inactive - DSP usage corresponds to modules loaded))
This module has no effect in itself, but allows you to load any non-modular effects into the Modular patch. This means that all factory and (maybe more importantly) all third-party effects can be incorporated into your modular patches. This version is for loading Mono effects. You can set the amount of wet/dry signal which is output from the module. Clicking the Active switch not only bypasses the effect, but also unloads the effect from the DSP. 
Stereo Insert (0% (when inactive - DSP usage corresponds to modules loaded))
As above, but for use with Stereo effects.

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